Youth Leadership roles

 

Junior Leader

You can have an amazing time while you grow your skills by taking on a leadership role with a younger Unit of Guides. By doing so, your leadership skills will continue to develop and you can be a fantastic role model to the younger girls. Depending on your age you can become either a Junior Leader or a Guide Helper. 

Junior Leaders are Guides aged 14-17 years while Guide Helpers are Guides aged 9 - 14 years. Both Junior Leaders and Guide Helpers work in a leadership role within a younger-aged Guide Unit and are financial youth members of their State Guide organisation.

There is also the opportunity to help with a younger aged unit on a one off basis, such as helping on a sleepover or running an activity for another unit if you are unable to make the ongoing commitment to being a Junior Leader or a Guide Helper..

 

 

 

How do I become a Junior Leader?

  • Talk it over with your parents/carers – it is an additional commitment and you will need their support.
  • Discuss the idea with your Guide Leader and District Leader. They will help you decide which Unit is most appropriate for you to be working with.
  • Register as a Junior Leader using the Junior Leader Registration form (PROG.6).
  • Return the registration form to your State Program Adviser at your State Guide office.
  • For more information about being a Junior Leader read the Girl's Guide to being a Junior Leader

Junior Leader

 

What time commitment do I need to make as a Junior Leader?

This is up to you and the Unit that you are working with as a Junior Leader. Some Junior Leaders go to their Unit weekly, others fortnightly, others monthly. Guide Leaders know that you are busy – with school, other activities, homework, paid employment. You may even need to change your commitment from time to time depending on other activities (i.e. during exam periods). Talk to the Guide Leader you are working with so that she knows what you are doing.

 

Can I work as a Junior Leader in the Unit that I’ve just been a member of?

It is recommended that you have at least a 6 month break from your present Unit if you are wanting to work as a Junior Leader there, or move to another Unit for at least 6 months before returning. This enables everyone to recognise that you are now assisting in the running of the Unit.

 

Do I have to do badge work as a Junior Leader?

Not if you don’t want to or you can work on lots of badges. The choice is completely yours. However Girl Guides Australia recommends that you consider working on -

  • Achieve-a-Challenge Leadership 3 - challenges found in Look Wider Still
  • Leadership Focus - challenges found in Aim High and don't forget to register with your State Guide organisation before you start

Both these badges will assist in you developing excellent leadership skills that will be greatly valued by your Unit, as well as outside of Guiding. You can of course work on other badges, such as

  • Explore-a-Challenges
  • Achieve-a-Challenges
  • Queen’s Guide Award - don't forget to register with your State Guide organisation before you start

Remember that these badges do require peer (girls of a similar age) assessment – so you will need to be a member of a peer Unit as well.

 

Do I need to be in a peer Unit as well?

You will only need to be in a peer Unit (i.e. Unit that caters for 14+) if you are working on any of the above-mentioned Guide badges as they require peer assessment. Being a part of a peer Unit doesn’t mean just turning up when the planned activity is to your liking and when you need badge work assessed. You need to make a regular commitment (i.e. weekly, fortnightly, monthly or twice a term) to this Unit. You should also participate in the planning activities, not only by suggesting activity ideas but also helping to plan and implement them.

 

What is peer assessment?

Peer assessment is when your peers (i.e. Guides around the same age as you) assess your efforts. Check with your peer Unit Leader about the processes in place within your Unit or what needs to be done to ensure that your Unit can support you in this.

 

Have you truly done your best?

This is what your Unit should be asking you. You should discuss your choice of challenges with your Unit and Leader before starting the challenges, and gain their approval. Once you have completed each challenge, you should discuss the challenge again with your peer Unit and Leader.

Some of the questions that your Unit and Leader might like to ask you are:

  • How did the challenge go?
  • Did you achieve everything that you set out to achieve?
  • Did you enjoy yourself?
  • If others were involved, did they enjoy themselves?
  • What would you change if you did it again?
  • What was the most difficult part of the challenge?
  • What skills or knowledge did you gain from the challenge?

You might want to also share your thoughts on:

  • The best part of the challenge
  • The most difficult part of the challenge and what you would do differently next time.
  • What you learnt from doing the challenge
  • What part of the challenge you are proudest of.

This helps everyone decide if the challenge was satisfactory and if it has been met.

 

What if I want to become a Guide Leader once I turn 18?

That’s great! A lot of Junior Leaders make this decision. Girl Guides Australia is currently reviewing the sections of the Australian Adult Leadership Program (the adult Leadership Qualification) suitable for you to be accredited with if you have completed the Leadership Focus. Watch this space for further information. Talk to your District Leader in the meantime about taking on an adult leadership role in Guiding.

Guide Helpers are Guides aged 9 – 14 years who work in a leadership role within a younger-aged Guide Unit. They are financial youth members of their State Guide organisation.

 

How do I become a Guide Helper?

  • Talk this over with your parents/carers first – it is an additional commitment and you will need their support
  • Discuss it with your Guide Leader and District Leader. They will help you decide which Unit is most appropriate for you to be working with.

 

What time commitment do I need to make as a Guide Helper?

This is up to you and the Unit that you are working with as a Guide Helper. Some Guide Helpers go to their Unit weekly, others fortnightly, others monthly. Guide Leaders know that you are busy – with school, other activities and homework. You may even need to change your commitment from time to time depending on other activities. Talk to the Guide Leader you are working with so that she knows about all your other activities.

 

Can I work as a Guide Helper in the Unit that I’ve just been a member of?

It is recommended that you have at least a 6 month break from your peer Unit if you are wanting to work as a Guide Helper there, or move to another Unit for at least 6 months before returning. This enables everyone to recognise that you are now assisting in the running of the Unit.

 

What do I wear as a Guide Helper?

  • Wear your normal Guide uniform
  • Guide Helper badge - Guide Helper badge is available from your State Guide Retail outlet. (Or your Unit, District or Region may purchase this badge for you.)

 

Do I have to do badge work as a Guide Helper?

No, not if you don’t want to or you can work on lots of badges whilst being a Guide Helper. The choice is completely yours. Girl Guides Australia recommends that you consider trying -

  • Achieve-a-Challenge Leadership 1 and 2 - challenges found in Look Wide

These badges will assist you in developing great leadership skills that will be valued in your Unit, as well as outside of Guiding. You can of course work on other badges such as -

  • Create-a-Challenges - challenges found in Look Wide
  • Explore-a-Challenges - challenges found in Look Wide
  • Junior BP or BP Awards - challenges found in Aim High

Remember that most Guide badges do require peer (girls around your age) assessment – so you will need to be a member of a peer Unit as well.

 

Do I need to be in a peer Unit as well?

You will only need to be in a peer Unit (i.e. Unit that caters for your age range) if you are working on any Guide badges as most Guide badges require you to check with your patrol, friends or Unit that you have challenged yourself. Being a part of a peer Unit doesn’t mean just turning up when the planned activity is to your liking and when you need badge work assessed (checked). You need to make a regular commitment (weekly, fortnightly, monthly or twice a term) to this Unit. You should also participate in the planning activities, not only by suggesting activity ideas but also helping to plan and implement them.

 

What is peer assessment?

Peer assessment is when your peers (i.e. Guides around the same age as you) assess your efforts. Check with your peer Unit Leader about the processes in place within your Unit or what needs to be done to ensure that your Unit can support you in this.

 

“Have you truly done your best?”

This is what your Unit should be asking you. You should discuss your choice of challenges with your Unit and Leader before starting the challenges, and gain their approval. Once you have completed each challenge, you should discuss the challenge again with your peer Unit and Leader.

Some of the questions that your Unit and Leader might like to ask you are:

  • How did the challenge go?
  • Did you achieve everything that you set out to achieve?
  • Did you enjoy yourself?
  • If others were involved, did they enjoy themselves?
  • What would you change if you did it again?
  • What was the most difficult part of the challenge?
  • What skills or knowledge did you gain from the challenge?

You might want to also share your thoughts on:

  • The best part of the challenge
  • The most difficult part of the challenge and what you would do differently next time.
  • What you learnt from doing the challenge
  • What part of the challenge you are proudest of.

This helps everyone decide if the challenge was satisfactory and if it has been met.

 

What if I want to continue helping in a Unit after I turn 14?

That’s great! A lot of Guide Helpers make this decision. On turning 14 – you can become a Junior Leader. Talk to your District Leader about it.